Learn How to Become a Radiologist at Quality Education Jobs

Learn How to Become a Radiologist at Quality Education Jobs
Source: Wikipedia

 

Radiologist: A Quick Look
Median Salary $375,816 or $180.68 per hour
Entry-level Education Medical Degree
On-the-job training An Internship and Residency
Primary employers Private/public hospitals and outpatient facilities
Number of positions (U.S.) 347,200
Job Growth (2012-2022) 14% (Slightly faster than National Average)
New positions (2012-2022) 51,700

Radiologist Job Description:

How to Become a Radiologist

Source: Wikipedia

The radiologist job description includes recommending a particular diagnostic test for a certain ailment or set of symptoms, analyzing the results of various diagnostic medical tests (such as computed tomography scans or CT scans, xrays, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRIs and others), making treatment recommendations based on test results, and working with other physicians to address the patients’ medical needs. This is done either through a written report summarizing the findings of the diagnostic tests or face-to-face with the other physician or physicians. In some instances, the radiologist may even convey the results of diagnostic tests directly to the patient. The radiologist may answer patients’ questions about the test results. You can learn more about the typical radiologist job description here.

Radiologist Salary

As of February 2016, the median annual radiologist salary is $375,816 or $180.68 per hour. However, the annual salary can range from $103,000 all the way up to $467,000. Salary is typically influenced by type of employer (private hospital, public hospital, or outpatient facility), years of experience, location the individual is employed, or even notoriety in a certain area or community. However, location tends to be the most significant factor influencing annual salary for radiologists. It is possible that radiologists will receive additional money through profit sharing or bonuses. You can learn more about the radiologist salary here.

How to Become a Radiologist

Are you wondering how to become a radiologist? It is not exactly an easy process. To start out, you need to earn a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. However, it is beneficial to take foundational classes while you are still in high school. Following high school, individuals will need to earn a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college. After that, you must earn a medical degree from an accredited program. Then, you must complete internships and residencies. If you would like to learn more interested, check out the section on how to become a radiologist here.

CHECK OUT THIS LIST OF LOCAL OR ONLINE RADIOLOGIST SCHOOL AVAILABLE TO YOU

Radiologist Job Outlook

According to BLS data, the Radiologist Job Outlook is anticipated to grow by 14% for radiologists between the years 2014 to 2024. This rate of growth is higher than the average rate of growth for all other occupations in the United States. By 2022, it is estimated that there will be somewhere around 51,700 new positions for radiologists in the United States. Read on to learn more about the radiologist job outlook.

Radiologist Salary

Due to the high responsibility level and amount of education required to become a radiologist, the radiologist salary is rather high. This is especially the case when you compare the salary to that of all other occupations in the United States. As of February of 2016, the annual salary for radiologists in the U.S. was $375,816 or $180.68 per hour. The median value differs from the value of the average salary. Under some circumstances, these numbers may be very close. The median annual value indicates the exact middle monetary value of all recorded radiologist salaries within the United States. What this means is that half of all radiologists employed in the U.S. have earned less than $378,816, and half have earned more than $378,816.
  • The highest earning radiologists in the U.S. earned somewhere around $467,000 annually
  • The lowest earning radiologists in the United States earned an annual salary of around $103,000 or less
You may see some variances in the radiologist salary based on several different factors. These factors may include: type of employer, years of work experience, location, or even a radiologist’s notoriety in a certain area or community. Radiologists who are employed by healthcare organizations tend to earn the highest annual salaries of around $389,000, as compared with those who work in office-based solo practices who tend to earn the lowest annual salaries ($237,000).
  • Radiologists employed in the Northwest region of the United States tend to earn the highest salaries of around $404,000 annually
  • Radiologists who are employed in the South Central region of the United States typically earn the lowest salaries (based on region) at $322,000 annually

How to Become a Radiologist

Do you want to learn more about how to become a Radiologist? If so, read on! To become a radiologist, you need to earn a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. Before starting college, it is helpful to take relevant classes in high school. These classes include upper level mathematics and science classes, English and communication classes, social science classes, and anatomy and physiology classes. In college, individuals who want to become radiologists should choose majors such as pre-medicine, biology, or other medicine/science related programs. These programs will provide students with a solid background in science that will help prepare them for the rigors of medical school. Common undergraduate classes may include microbiology, organic chemistry, physics, anatomy and physiology, calculus, human psychology, and more. Lab classes are especially important as they give students a chance to get hands-on experience. While in college, it can be very helpful for students to spend time shadowing physicians and radiologists so they learn more about the profession. It can also prove beneficial for undergraduate students to work in nursing homes or hospitals while they are still in school. After completing college, students can apply to medical programs. Students must complete (and score very well) on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) prior to submitting medical school applications. Medical school admission is highly competitive and gaining admission can prove extremely difficult. Once accepted into medical school, students will complete 4 intensive, rigorous years of study. Upon completing the 4 years of medical school and passing all required tests, graduates must complete an internship to gain hands-on training as a physician. After that, they can move on to their specialized residencies (in this case, in radiology). This requires 4 additional years of study in order to become specialized in radiology. Near the conclusion of those 4 years, individuals must pass state board examinations. For individuals who want to become specialized in a certain area of radiology, they can select a one or two-year radiology fellowship. All states require the successful completion of state board examinations and licensing tests.

Radiologist Job Description

The radiologist job description includes diagnostic tests, analyzing the results of various diagnostic medical tests, making treatment recommendations based on test results, and working with other physicians. A typical radiologist job description contains the following job responsibilities:
  • Recommending a particular diagnostic test for a patient based on a set of symptoms, medical history, and other factors
  • Analyzing the results of various diagnostic medical tests (such as PET scans, computed tomography scans or CT scans, Xrays, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRIs and others)
  • Forming treatment recommendations based on the diagnostic test results
  • Conveying the results and their interpretations of the diagnostic tests to other physicians either via summative report or verbally
  • Working collaboratively with other physicians and medical personnel to address the patients’ medical needs
A radiologist’s primary job is to order and analyze medical tests for their patients. This is a highly important job, as radiologists may have the ability and opportunity to spot potentially life altering or life threatening diseases early on. The job is both stressful and rewarding. Radiologists must take into account a patient’s current symptoms, medical history, and previous diagnostic test results to determine what diagnostic tests are most necessary. Then, they must carefully analyze and draw conclusions based on the results of the tests. Radiologists may analyze a variety of medical tests from CT scans, MRIs, Xrays, PET scans, nuclear imaging, ultrasounds, and more. They must also convey the results of the medical tests as well as their analysis of the results to other physicians. This is done through face-to-face discussions with other physicians or through detailed summative reports of their findings. Radiologists must stay current on new information in their field as advances in technology constantly mold and reshape the diagnostic testing abilities. The field is complex, innovative, and highly important within the broader field of medicine. Radiologists typically spend less than 30 hours per week actually working directly with their patients. Instead, they spend many hours analyzing test results, coming up with diagnoses, and collaborating with other physicians. Several hours each week are dedicated to paperwork and documentation. It is not uncommon to find radiologists working in hospitals or outpatient medical facilities. They may work long, unusual hours in order to meet patients’ needs in a timely manner. Radiologists may have to work weekends, evenings, or on holidays.

Radiologist Job Outlook

The radiologist job outlook is expected to remain extremely strong. Projections indicate that the field of radiology will grow by approximately 14% between 2014 and 2024. This is higher than the average growth of all other occupations in the United States. By 2022, it is estimated that there will be somewhere around 51,700 new positions for radiologists in the United States. As a large portion of the United States population ages, there will likely be greater demand and therefore job security for radiologists. Although job security will likely be good for years to come, radiologists may need to be somewhat flexible about the location in which they are employed as a result of high competition for positions in this particular area of the medical field. This is especially the case for radiologists who have very a specific subspecialty. Like many areas of the medical field, there will always be some degree of demand for radiologists as individuals will continually need diagnostic tests, analysis, and diagnosis.

 

Get Your Degree!

Find schools and get information on the program that’s right for you.

Powered by Campus Explorer

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*